Our Donkeys

We acquired our two adult Donkeys in May 2017 shortly after the Alpacas arrived. Morag our brown female who is 8 years old and Ffion the skewbald who is only 4 years old.  

After lots of research we learnt that Donkeys and Alpacas would live together harmoniously. Even so it was with some trepidation that we introduced them into the Alpaca paddock.  They eyed each other curiously for a number of days but now we are pleased to say they all get along famously!

Donkey

Donkeys at Mulberry

INFORMATION

A male donkey or ass is called a jack, a female a jenny or jennet; a young donkey is a foal. Jack donkeys are often used to mate with female horses to produce mules; the biological ‘reciprocal’ of a mule, from a stallion and jenny as its parents instead, is called a hinny.


Asses were first domesticated around 3000 BC, probably in Egypt or Mesopotamia, and have spread around the world. They continue to fill important roles in many places today. While domesticated species are increasing in numbers, the African wild ass is an endangered species. As beasts of burden and companions, asses and donkeys have worked together with humans for millennia.


Our New foal

Ffion gave birth to our beautiful female foal Esme shortly before joining us here at Mulberry. Her lovely, fluffy coat made her instantly a very popular member of our extended family! The life expectancy of our Donkeys is between 30 and 50 years so Esme is set to be a feature here at the house for many years to come. All girls, so we will have to have a think about that!

Ffion gave birth to our beautiful female foal Esme shortly before joining us here at Mulberry. Her lovely, fluffy coat made her instantly a very popular member of our extended family! The life expectancy of our Donkeys is between 30 and 50 years so Esme is set to be a feature here at the house for many years to come. All girls, so we will have to have a think about that!

Donkey and Foal

INFORMATION

The donkey or ass (Equus africanus asinus) is a domesticated member of the horse family, Equidae. The wild ancestor of the donkey is the African wild ass. The donkey has been used as a working animal for at least 5000 years. There are more than 40 million donkeys in the world, mostly in underdeveloped countries, where they are used principally as draught or pack animals.


Working donkeys are often associated with those living at or below subsistence levels. Small numbers of donkeys are kept for breeding or as pets in developed countries.